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Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio
Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio


Kia Rio vs Hyundai i20 vs Renault Clio | Auto Express

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Kia Rio vs Hyundai i20 vs Renault Clio | Auto Express Where the i20 does get one over the Rio is boot capacity: the Hyundai can muster 352 litres against the Kia’s 325 litres. The door bins can … …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Kia Rio vs Hyundai i20 vs Renault Clio | Auto Express Where the i20 does get one over the Rio is boot capacity: the Hyundai can muster 352 litres against the Kia’s 325 litres. The door bins can … Can the new Kia Rio challenge the Renault Clio and Hyundai i20 for supermini honours?
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Can the new Kia Rio challenge the Renault Clio and Hyundai i20 for supermini honours

Kia Rio

Hyundai i20

Renault Clio

Verdict

Also consider

Figures

Kia Rio vs Hyundai i20 vs Renault Clio | Auto Express
Kia Rio vs Hyundai i20 vs Renault Clio | Auto Express

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Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio | CarsGuide

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio | CarsGuide Are you looking to buy a car but can’t dece between a Hyundai i20 or Kia Rio? Use our se by se comparison to help you make a decision. We compare … …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio | CarsGuide Are you looking to buy a car but can’t dece between a Hyundai i20 or Kia Rio? Use our se by se comparison to help you make a decision. We compare … Are you looking to buy a car but can’t decide between a Hyundai i20 or Kia Rio? Use our side by side comparison to help you make a decision. We compare design, practicality, price, features, engine, transmission, fuel consumption, driving, safety & ownership of both models and give you our expert verdict.
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Summary

Verdict

Design

Practicality

Price and features

Engine & trans

Fuel consumption

Driving

Safety

Ownership

Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio | CarsGuide
Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio | CarsGuide

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Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio vs Toyota Yaris: which should you buy? | Carbuyer

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio vs Toyota Yaris: which should you buy? | Carbuyer By virtue of being by some margin the oldest of the three cars here, the Kia Rio does feel a bit more dated in comparison with the Toyota Yaris … …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio vs Toyota Yaris: which should you buy? | Carbuyer By virtue of being by some margin the oldest of the three cars here, the Kia Rio does feel a bit more dated in comparison with the Toyota Yaris … Find out which of these top superminis is right for you with our in-depth three-way comparison
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Find out which of these top superminis is right for you with our in-depth three-way comparison

Which is the best to drive

Which is the cheapest to run

Which has the best interior

Which is the most practical

Which should you buy

Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio vs Toyota Yaris: which should you buy? | Carbuyer
Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio vs Toyota Yaris: which should you buy? | Carbuyer

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Hyundai i20 vs KIA Rio – Mana Yang Lebih Baik?

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Hyundai i20 vs KIA Rio – Mana Yang Lebih Baik? Hyundai i20 vs KIA Rio – mana pilihan yang tepat? Di oto.com Anda bisa membandingkan i20 vs Rio lebih dari 200 parameter mulai dari harga, review pengguna, … …
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Komparasi Berdasarkan Foto

Perbandingan Review

Dari Para Ahli

Bandingkan KIA Rio Dengan Mobil Sejenis

Video Hyundai i20 dan KIA Rio

Perbandingan Mobil Oleh Redaksi

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Hyundai i20 vs KIA Rio  - Mana Yang Lebih Baik?
Hyundai i20 vs KIA Rio – Mana Yang Lebih Baik?

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Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better?

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better? Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better? · 3 reasons to buy the Hyundai i20. 1. More engine capacity. 199 cc bigger engine displacement. · 5 reasons to … …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better? Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better? · 3 reasons to buy the Hyundai i20. 1. More engine capacity. 199 cc bigger engine displacement. · 5 reasons to … A detailed comparison of Hyundai i20 versus Kia Rio. On Car A Rac you will find out which car is better and what the car will suit you best.
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Our Score for Hyundai i20 VS Kia Rio

3 reasons to buy the Hyundai i20

5 reasons to buy the Kia Rio

Neutral comparisons between the Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio

Comparison of Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio conclusions and opinions

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Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better?
Compare Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio. Which is Better?

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kia rio vs hyundai i 20

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about kia rio vs hyundai i 20 The Hyundai i20 offer the second-largest infotainment screen of the three with the interior retaining a 7.0-inch interface. Similar to the Fiat … …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for kia rio vs hyundai i 20 The Hyundai i20 offer the second-largest infotainment screen of the three with the interior retaining a 7.0-inch interface. Similar to the Fiat …
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kia rio vs hyundai i 20
kia rio vs hyundai i 20

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Hyundai i20 1.2 vs KIA Rio 1.2 CVVT – AutoManiac

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    Hyundai i20 1.2 vs KIA Rio 1.2 CVVT – AutoManiac KIA appears just a bit more reliable, although the difference is truly marginal. The most important thing when decing between any two vehicles should always … …
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    Hyundai i20 1.2 vs KIA Rio 1.2 CVVT – AutoManiac KIA appears just a bit more reliable, although the difference is truly marginal. The most important thing when decing between any two vehicles should always … cars,prices,specs,information,advise,opinions,buying,selling,brands,models,failures,consumption,accelerationCompare two vehicles and get Virtual Adviser’s™ opinion
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			Hyundai i20  1.2 vs KIA Rio  1.2 CVVT - AutoManiac
Hyundai i20 1.2 vs KIA Rio 1.2 CVVT – AutoManiac

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Kia Rio vs. Hyundai i20: which of these popular hatchbacks has the better resale value at auctions in SA? | Wheels

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Kia Rio vs. Hyundai i20: which of these popular hatchbacks has the better resale value at auctions in SA? | Wheels In the 0 to 100 000km category, the i20 achieves 65% of its original list price on auction – versus the Rio at 68%. In the 100 000 to 200 000km … …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Kia Rio vs. Hyundai i20: which of these popular hatchbacks has the better resale value at auctions in SA? | Wheels In the 0 to 100 000km category, the i20 achieves 65% of its original list price on auction – versus the Rio at 68%. In the 100 000 to 200 000km … The Kia Rio and Hyundai i20 are two of the most popular hatches in the South African market. Find out which of these cars has the better resale value.
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Kia Rio vs. Hyundai i20: which of these popular hatchbacks has the better resale value at auctions in SA? | Wheels
Kia Rio vs. Hyundai i20: which of these popular hatchbacks has the better resale value at auctions in SA? | Wheels

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Kia Rio vs Hyundai i20 vs Renault Clio

Kia is undergoing quite a transformation. The firm is rolling out a new logo, there’s a fleet of advanced EVs in the pipeline, and its design team is creating some of the most eye-catching cars on sale. However, at its core Kia is known for developing affordable and reliable cars. The Rio has been central to those values for years, and in a bid to keep it fresh Kia has updated the supermini with a subtle exterior redesign and introduced new mild-hybrid tech. Up against the new Hyundai i20 and Renault Clio, however, the Rio has some seriously stiff competition. The French supermini sets the benchmark in this class when it comes to style, refinement and technology, three key areas buyers consider when in the market for a supermini. It’s the current Auto Express Supermini of the Year. What Hyundai has developed with the i20 is nothing short of astonishing. What was once a dumpy and forgettable supermini has been transformed into a fantastic little runabout. These two models represent the very best that is currently on offer in the supermini market, so if the updated Rio is to succeed it has to be able to compete with these two class leaders. Kia Rio 41 Model: Kia Rio 1.0 T-GDi 118bhp 48V 3 Price: £19,145 Engine: 1.0-litre 3cyl turbo, 118bhp 0-62mph: 9.8 seconds Test economy: 39.7mpg/8.7mpl CO2: 122g/km Annual road tax: £175 The fourth-generation Kia Rio was launched in 2017, so this latest car is a thorough refresh rather than an all-new model. The big news is the arrival of a mild-hybrid 1.0-litre engine for the first time. Yet the engine is only offered in 3 trim and above, which makes the Kia the priciest of this trio, at £19,145.

Design & engineering The supermini class is so crowded it’s often easy to overlook some cars that have been around for decades; the Kia Rio is one of them. It first arrived back in 1999 but has fallen by the wayside amid a flurry of stylish and affordable models from rival manufacturers. The latest fourth-generation version has received a mechanical and visual update. The exterior makeover isn’t drastic but Kia has added a more prominent version of its Tiger Nose grille and reshaped the front bumper. The Rio still looks rather anonymous to our eyes, especially up against something as handsome as the Clio and eye-catching as the i20. 41 Inside, there’s a smattering of new materials aimed at making the Rio feel a bit more upmarket and an updated eight-inch infotainment system. The biggest revamp with the Rio, however, is what you can’t see; under the skin engineers have fitted the supermini with a new 1.0-litre three-cylinder mild-hybrid powertrain. It’s exactly the same unit that you’ll find in the i20 we’re testing here, too. It develops a modest 118bhp and 172Nm of torque, and comes paired with Kia’s clever six-speed ‘Intelligent Manual Transmission”. It acts in every way like a normal manual gearbox but there is no physical connection between the clutch pedal and the clutch itself. Instead, the movement of your left leg is relayed electronically. The main benefit is that the engine is able to shut down and coast when you lift off the throttle, which boosts fuel economy.

Driving If you were hoping the Rio’s rather anonymous looks were going to be offset by excellent driving dynamics, well, you’re going to be disappointed. That’s not to say that the Rio is a bad car to drive, it’s perfectly acceptable, but with such rich and accomplished opposition in the class, like the Clio and i20, the Rio really needs to do more to stand out. 41 A strong point is that new 1.0-litre mild-hybrid engine. It feels sprightly, developing 118bhp, and is the quickest car of the three, hitting 0-62mph in 9.8 seconds. It feels it too, with decent shove low down in the rev range, which gives plenty of flexibility when accelerating up to motorway speeds. Extend the engine right up to 6,000rpm and it does sound a little coarse, but as the bulk of the motor’s power has been accessed by 4,000rpm there is little need to rev the engine beyond that point. By comparison, the Clio’s three-cylinder engine is a lot quieter at speed. The Kia’s mild-hybrid system is another plus point in its favour, because the only time you’ll notice the engine cutting out is when you see the rev needle drop. You can’t feel or hear the system at work, such is its seamless integration.

Less impressive, however, is the Rio’s steering and suspension set-up. Again, it’s not bad, but the ride is firmer than that in the Clio, fidgeting over slight bumps and ripples in the road surface. It’s comfortable enough but the quality of the ride doesn’t challenge the class leaders here. The steering, meanwhile, is very light and devoid of feel. It makes manoeuvering at city speeds a breeze, but there’s not much enjoyment to be had behind the wheel on faster, winding roads. Practicality Only a few millimetres separate the Rio from the i20 and Clio, but the Kia is the least practical of the three superminis. The 325-litre boot isn’t small, but it’s almost 70 litres down on what you get in the Clio, which is quite a lot given the relatively small dimensions of the cars. And don’t think the trade-off is more rear passenger space; there’s just as much room in the back of the Rio as the i20, which again has a larger boot than the Kia. Head and kneeroom are both pretty good: you can sit two adults back there in relative comfort, but three would be a squeeze. One benefit of the Kia is that when you drop the rear bench it lies almost flat – handy for loading longer, bulky items – and the 1,103-litre load bay is bigger than that in the Clio with the seats folded.

Ownership One major draw for buyers here is Kia’s seven-year/100,000-mile warranty; few other brands offer such attractive cover. Not that you’re likely to have to make much use of it, because Kia has built up a solid reputation for reliability; in our Driver Power 2020 survey, Kia finished in second position. The dealer network is also highly rated, finishing fifth in our survey, too. The mild-hybrid model we have here is only available from Kia’s upper-spec 3 trim, so there’s no shortage of safety kit; Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA), Lane-Follow Assist (LFA) and cruise control are all included as standard. Running costs Despite the trick mild-hybrid powertrain the Rio returned 39.7mpg on our test, the lowest of the three cars here. However, there wasn’t a great deal in it and it’s likely that the Kia’s extra power counted against it here. It means that, over 12,000 miles you’ll spend around £1,649 on fuel, almost £300 more than you would in the more fuel-efficient Renault Clio. The slightly higher CO2 emissions of 122g/km mean the Rio will be marginally more expensive than its two rivals here to run as a company car, at £1,022 and £2,044 annually for the standard and higher-rate taxpayer respectively. The Hyundai will cost £956 and £1,911, and the Renault £903 and £1,806 annually in Benefit-in-Kind contributions.

Testers’ notes “The six-speed iMT is a great gearbox, but Kia does offer buyers the option of a DCT automatic transmission for a £1,000 premium on 3-spec versions of the Rio hatchback.” Hyundai i20 41 Model: Hyundai i20 1.0 T-GDi 100 Hybrid SE Connect Price: £18,595 Engine: 1.0-litre 3cyl turbo, 99bhp 0-62mph: 10.4 seconds Test economy: 45.2mpg/9.9mpl CO2: 115g/km Annual road tax: £175 Hyundai really upped its game with the latest i20, taking what was a forgettable supermini and transforming it into a challenger in this class. Here in entry-level SE Connect specification it’s also great value, starting at £18,595, and comes fitted with the same mild-hybrid technology offered in the Kia. Design & engineering Although they look very different, the i20 and Rio share a lot in common. They use the same basic architecture, the same 1.0-litre engine and six-speed iMT manual gearbox. Yet Hyundai has managed to use the tools at its disposal to produce a supermini that is slightly smaller but more practical than the car from its sister brand. The i20 was the first of the two to use the 1.0-litre mild-hybrid powertrain, which is supported by a 48-volt electrical system and integrated belt-starter generator. As with the Kia, the system uses a small lithium-ion battery, located in the boot floor, which has enough juice to run components like the power steering, allowing the engine to shut down while coasting to save fuel.

Yet the i20 uses a slightly less powerful version of that engine, developing 99bhp but an identical 172Nm of torque. Acceleration is marginally affected but fuel economy takes a boost as a trade-off. 41 While the running gear is the same, one area the i20 does have the Kia beaten is standard equipment levels, despite being cheaper. The Hyundai gets a set of slick 10.25-inch digital dials as standard, yet they aren’t even an option in the Rio. But while there is an eight-inch infotainment system fitted, it comes without sat-nav in SE Connect trim. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are both fitted as an alternative, so buyers can plug in their smartphone and access navigation that way when necessary. The i20’s cabin is perhaps a bit of a weak point. While the infotainment and digital dials are great, the rest of the interior is covered in hard, scratchy plastics that make it feel cheap. It certainly feels built to last, that’s for sure, but up against the Clio in this test its shortcomings on fit and finish are highlighted. Driving Where the little Hyundai has come on leaps and bounds is from behind the wheel: this is a car that now drives as sharply as it looks. It’s not quite as entertaining as a Ford Fiesta, but given what the old i20 was – dull and forgettable – it’s a huge improvement.

Like all of the cars in this test, the i20’s suspension comprises MacPherson struts up front and a torsion-beam rear axle. But it’s more than 100kg lighter than its two rivals and that can really be felt with the way the i20 covers ground. It’s smooth and compliant over most surfaces, with the softer set-up taking the sting out of any nasty potholes on the move. But that’s not at the expense of body control, so when you up the pace and ask for faster changes in direction through corners the i20 feels up to the job and not out of its depth. The steering has a nice weight and it’s consistent from turn to turn, which allows you to point the car’s nose precisely into corners. 41 Performance from the 1.0-litre mild-hybrid engine can’t be described as anything more than adequate, with a 0-62mph time of 10.4 seconds. In truth, the i20 feels faster than that number suggests, with a decent wave of torque available from 1,500rpm; it means the engine revs keenly and smoothly helped by that added electrical assistance. It’s a very quiet engine, too, more so than that in the Rio, so it makes for a competent motorway cruiser at higher speeds. A bonus here is the ‘sailing’ function when you lift off the throttle; the engine is able to cut out completely, thanks to the 48-volt electrics. As in the i20, it’s a brilliantly integrated system and the only time you’ll notice it working is when a small ‘sailing flash’ illuminates on the digital dials.

Practicality The i20 may be a little shorter than the Rio but the wheelbase is identical at 2,580mm. There’s almost nothing between them when it comes to passenger space, so two adults will fit without any problems in the rear. Where the i20 does get one over the Rio is boot capacity: the Hyundai can muster 352 litres against the Kia’s 325 litres. The door bins can swallow a one-litre bottle and there’s a couple of cup-holders down on the centre console. However, there is no armrest or storage bin between the seats in the i20. It’s hardly a deal-breaker but it means keeping your valuables out of sight is a pain, so they need to be tucked away in the glove compartment instead. Ownership A big pull for buyers here is Hyundai’s five-year/unlimited-mileage warranty, even if it’s not as long as Kia’s deal. Hyundai lingers in mid-table in our Driver Power poll in 13th, behind Kia but ahead of Renault. The i20 hasn’t yet been tested by Euro NCAP but based on the level of safety kit, and Hyundai’s reputation for safety, it should achieve a very good rating. All i20s feature Autonomous Emergency Brake (AEN), Driver Attention Alert (DAA), Forward Collisions Assist (FCA) and Lane-Keep Assist (LKA) with Lane Departure Warning (LDW).

Running costs THE i20 averaged 45.2mpg on test, which is around 10mpg down on the official claim, but a slightly better performance than what we saw from the Rio. Hyundai’s more modest kerbweight certainly helped it there. It means that over the course of a year you’ll spend around £1,450 on fuel if you average 12,000 miles per year. The i20’s lower CO2 emissions of 115g/km help sneak it into a lower Benefit-in-Kind bracket (26 per cent) than the Rio (27 per cent) for company car users. It means the i20 will cost lower-rate taxpayers £956 per year rather than the £1,022 required by the Kia. Testers’ notes “The battery for the 48-volt mild-hybrid system sits beneath the boot floor, so there is no space-saver spare wheel. Instead buyers get a repair kit.” Renault Clio 41 Model: Renault Clio TCe 100 Iconic Price: £17,595 Engine: 1.0-litre 3cyl turbo, 99bhp 0-62mph: 11.8 seconds Test economy: 48.2mpg/10.6mpl CO2: 119g/km Annual road tax: £175 We’re already pretty familiar with the latest Renault Clio. The current Auto Express Supermini of the Year sets the benchmark for a number of reasons, chief among which are its excellent value for money, its class-leading practicality, and its genuinely premium feel. In mid-level Iconic trim it’s the cheapest car of the three here, starting from £17,595 Design & engineering The latest Clio marked a big departure from the model that came before it and key to that transformation was the switch to the Groupe Renault’s new CMF-B platform. It sits between the Rio and i20 in terms of size but is by some margin the most practical. Clever packaging has allowed engineers to free up more boot space and passenger room than its two rivals here.

Renault does offer the Clio with a complex but highly efficient hybrid powertrain, but the version we have here is the tried-and-tested 1.0-litre TCe three-cylinder that develops 99bhp and 160Nm of torque. It only comes paired with a five-speed manual gearbox, whereas its rivals both get six-speed units. 41 It’s also the slowest; Renault claims 0-62mph in a leisurely 11.8 seconds. But performance is not where the manufacturer has chosen to focus with the Clio: refinement and comfort are where the French supermini really excels. That’s evident immediately when you climb inside, because the Clio feels the most premium of the three cars on test. Sure, there’s a lot of plastic dotted around the cabin – that’s to be expected in a supermini – but the materials used are of higher quality and look a lot more pleasing on the eye. Of course, styling is subjective, but finished in the striking orange paintwork the Clio really stands out in this test. It is a £660 option but it really does help the Renault hatchback make a lasting impression. Driving You don’t have to cover many miles in the Clio to work out that it feels and drives like one of the most premium and accomplished superminis on the market. There’s little attempt to inject any sort of performance or sportiness into the driving experience, instead Renault’s engineers have focussed on making the model as relaxing and comfortable to drive as possible.

The 1.0-litre TCe engine is very smooth and quiet although it does feel a little underpowered, developing only 99bhp and 160Nm of torque. A little more power would be welcome – Renault says 0-62mph takes 11.8 seconds – because it’s easily the slowest car of our test trio. 41 However, once up to speed the Clio feels the most stable and has the best ride quality, always feeling supple and controlled. Even though it only gets a five-speed manual transmission, the engine fades away into the background, which makes motorways journeys no trouble at all. There’s not an awful lot of feeling in the steering but it’s consistently weighted from turn to turn, and that lack of power means the Renault isn’t the most involving car to drive down a B-road, however the Clio’s greater focus on comfort and overall refinement is a worthy trade-off. Practicality If you want as much space for as little money as possible, then the Clio is the supermini for you. Although it’s not a physically larger car than its two rivals here, Renault has managed to liberate much more space inside for passengers and all of their luggage. There’s a good amount of space up front with a big glovebox and wide door bins for large bottles. Space in the rear is also impressive with plenty of room for two six-foot adults. The Clio is also the best suited for those who want to carry three passengers in the back because shoulder room is more generous.

Where the Clio really gets one over its rivals is boot capacity. At 391 litres, there’s more space in the back of a Clio than a Volkswagen Golf, and that sits in the class above. Plus, there’s a split-level boot floor – neither the Kia or Hyundai feature this – which is handy for keeping valuables out of sight. However, dropping the seats does leave quite a large step between the boot floor and seat back. Ownership While the Clio is clearly an accomplished supermini, the same can’t be said of Renault as a brand and its dealer network. The French company finished 15th out of 30 in our Driver Power 2020 brands survey and its franchise network 22nd out of 25. Renault offers an industry-standard three-year/60,000-mile warranty, which isn’t as generous as those offered by Kia or Hyundai. Standard safety kit is pretty generous though, with Lane Departure Warning, cruise control, rear parking sensors, full LED head and tail-lights and traffic-sign recognition all featuring. And out of the three cars here, the Clio is the only one that comes with the option (£200) of a space-saver spare wheel. Running costs Despite not featuring any clever mild-hybrid technology, the Clio was actually the most efficient vehicle on our test, returning 48.2mpg. That’s only fractionally off Renault’s official claim of 52mpg. It means that over 12,000 miles you’ll spend £1,358 on fuel, the lowest out of the three cars on test.

Another bonus is the Clio’s CO2 emissions of 119g/km, which mean it sneaks into the 26-per-cent Benefit-in-Kind tax bracket. Coupled with its lower price tag, it is also the cheapest car here for business users; lower and higher-rate earners will pay only £903 and £1,806 per year respectively. That’s a £119 annual saving over the Rio for those company car drivers in the lower tax bracket. Testers’ notes “The Clio is the only one of the three superminis here that is offered with the option of a diesel engine. However, even in entry-level Play spec the Blue Dci 85 engine costs from £19,494.” Verdict First place: Renault Clio 41 Once again the Renault Clio hangs on to the top spot, but only just. As an all-rounder the Clio is a truly excellent supermini, wrapping up strong technology, great practicality and first-rate refinement in an eye-catching package. This TCe 100 engine is a little on the sluggish side, but the trade-off is a level of comfort and composure you’d expect from the class above. It’s also very well equipped and the cheapest model to buy and run. Second place: Hyundai i20 41 The gap between first and second here is very narrow, which goes to show just how much improved the latest i20 is. What was once a dour and forgettable car has transformed into a genuinely recommendable supermini that can cut it with the best of them. The mild-hybrid powertrain is very well refined and powerful enough, while the tech is among the best here. However, cheap interior materials let it down.

Hyundai i20 VS Kia Rio

Unusually for a manual car, the i20 N features a launch control system (with an adjustable rpm setting), which we found fiddly to get working, but with or without it, Hyundai claims a snappy 0-100km/h time of 6.7sec.

And it’s such a pleasure to steer a car with a slick-shifting manual gearbox. The six-speed unit features a rev-matching function accessed via the press of a racy red button on the steering wheel.

Buf for those who prefer an old-school, double-shuffle, heal-and-toe tap dance across the pedals, the relationship between the brake and accelerator is perfect.

And if you’re keen on Walter Rohrl-style left-foot braking, to help steady the car or steer it in fast cornering, the ESC is switchable through to Sport mode or completely off, allowing fuss-free simultaneous brake and throttle application.

There’s even a shift-timing indicator near the top of the instrument cluster, with colour bars closing in on each other as the tacho needle pushes towards the rev limiter. Fun.

Engine and exhaust noise is a combination of a raspy induction note and adjustable crackle and pop out the back, courtesy of a mechanical flap in the exhaust system, adjustable through three settings in N mode.

Traditionalists may not be thrilled by the addition of in-cabin synthetic enhancement of all of the above, but the net effect is thoroughly enjoyable.

It’s worth remembering in this context N stands for Namyang, Hyundai’s sprawling proving ground south of Seoul where the car was developed, and the Nürburgring where this go-fast i20 was fine-tuned.

The body has been specifically reinforced at 12 key points, along with additional welds, and “bolt-in underbody structures” to make the i20 N stiffer and more responsive.

The strut front, coupled (dual) torsion beam rear suspension has also been set up with increased (neg) camber and a revised anti-roll bar at the front, as well as specific springs, shocks and bushings.

A compact, mechanical LSD is added to the mix, and grippy 215/40 x 18 Pirelli P-Zero rubber was produced specifically for the car and is stamped ‘HN’ for Hyundai N. Impressive.

The end result is outstanding. Low-speed ride is firm, with suburban bumps and lumps making their presence felt, but that’s what you’re signing on for in a hot hatch at this price point.

This car feels balanced and well buttoned down. Power delivery is agreeably linear and at a fraction over 1.2 tonnes the i20 N is light, responsive and nimble. Mid-range urge is strong.

Steering feel is good, with assistance from a column-mounted motor taking nothing away from an intimate connection with the front tyres.

The sports front seats proved grippy and comfortable over long stints behind the wheel, and playing with the multiple N drive modes tweaking the engine, ESC, exhaust, and steering just adds to the involvement. There are twin N switches on the wheel for quick access to custom set-ups.

And that Torsen LSD is brilliant. I tried my best to provoke a spinning inside front wheel on the exit of tight corners, but the i20 N just puts its power down without so much as a chirp, as it rockets towards the next bend.

The brakes are 320mm vented at the front and 262mm solid at the rear. Calipers are single piston, but they’ve been beefed up and fitted with high-friction pads. The master cylinder is bigger than the standard i20 and the front rotors are cooled by lower control arm mounted air guides blowing through vented knuckles.

The launch i20 N fleet of around half a dozen cars copped an hours long hot lap pounding at Wakefield Park Raceway, near Goulburn NSW without drama. They’re well up to the task.

One niggle is a large turning circle. The data sheet says 10.5m but it feels like the car is carving a wide arc in U-turns or three-point turns.

A 2580mm wheelbase between the bumpers of a 4075mm car is substantial, and the steering’s relatively low gearing (2.2 turns lock-to-lock) no doubt has a lot to do with it. The price you pay for quick turn-in.

Hyundai i20 vs Kia Rio vs Toyota Yaris: which should you buy?

While small SUVs and compact crossovers may have stolen their thunder a bit, humble superminis remain a preferred pick for many new car buyers. The supermini remains one of the most popular types of car in the UK, which unsurprisingly means the manufacturers offer plenty of options if a small hatchback fits the bill for you. For this supermini comparison, we’re looking at the Kia Rio, Hyundai i20 and Toyota Yaris. While they don’t fly out of dealership showrooms as quickly as some other rivals like the Vauxhall Corsa, Ford Fiesta and Volkswagen Polo, the three small hatchbacks here are still strong sellers, and are definitely worth bearing in mind if you’re shopping around for a new supermini. Top 10 best small cars and superminis 2022 All three cars bring to the table their own strengths and weaknesses – some have the edge in areas like affordability and refinement, whereas others are better to drive and are nicer to spend longer journeys in. What the trio we’ve assembled all do is tick a lot of boxes to a good standard, making them solid picks for prospective small hatchback owners who may be considering one of the better known options. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the Toyota Yaris, Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio, and find out what each of these models’ respective strengths and weaknesses are. 10 Which is the best to drive? In their older incarnations, neither the Hyundai i20, Kia Rio or Toyota Yaris were renowned for the way they drove, though things have changed for the most part with these current versions. The Hyundai i20 in particular has seen a big transformation: whereas its predecessor was competent if bland to drive, the current car has better body control when cornering, sharper steering responses and overall feels planted on the road. It’s not quite as fun as class leaders like the Ford Fiesta, but the i20 isn’t that far off.

Likewise, the Toyota Yaris is also now a car that feels far more composed than the model it replaces. While not as precise or as fun as the Hyundai, the Yaris nevertheless is impressively smooth and responsive around town or on faster roads. Factor in the refinement and ease-of-use of the automatic-only hybrid powertrain, and the Toyota is quite relaxing and refined by supermini standards. In comparison with its fresher-faced peers, the Kia Rio (which first went on sale back in 2017), doesn’t quite hold up as well. Neither smooth nor firm and with a competent-if-not-engaging handling setup, the Kia Rio covers a number of bases, but doesn’t especially excel in any one area. It’s fine and capable enough to deal with day-to-day driving duties, though you may want to look elsewhere if you’d prefer a supermini that places more of an emphasis in areas like comfort, refinement or sportiness. 10 Which is the cheapest to run? If you’re looking to save on your fuel costs and predominantly spend your behind-the-wheel time around town, then the Toyota Yaris will probably be the best supermini for you from our selection here. According to Toyota, the hybrid-only Yaris can return up to 68.8mpg, thanks in large part to the electric motor that can give the engine extra assistance under acceleration. Depending on how much charge is in the battery, the Yaris is also capable of covering very short distances on electric power alone.

In contrast, the Hyundai i20 and Kia Rio aren’t as economical, though they are capable of returning good efficiency figures. This is especially true on the models using the 1.0-litre mild-hybrid petrol engine – with this powertrain under the bonnet, Hyundai quotes a maximum fuel economy figure of 55.4mpg for the i20, and Kia up to 54.3mpg for the Rio. In contrast, the non-hybrid 1.0-litre petrol (up to 52.3mpg) and 1.2-litre petrol (up to 53.3mpg) aren’t quite as impressive. 10 On the CO2 emissions front, the Toyota Yaris again has the advantage over its Hyundai and Kia rivals – albeit not a huge one. Emissions for the Yaris vary from 92g/km to 112g/km, so the first-year tax bill ranges from £140 to £180 depending on the spec. Because the Hyundai has a narrow spread of emissions (116g/km to 121g/km), all versions will cost £180 to tax for the first year, as does the Kia Rio (118g/km to 125g/km, depending on the engine and spec). With the first year’s tax usually included in the price of the car, these CO2 emissions will be more useful for company-car drivers looking to work out their Benefit-in-Kind tax costs. For the lowest insurance premiums, though, it may be the Kia Rio that’s worth going for. Insurance groups for this model range from group 4 for the entry-level 1.2-litre petrols, to group 9 for the 1.0-litre mild-hybrid GT-Line S cars. In contrast, the Hyundai i20 goes from insurance group 12 for entry-level SE Connect cars to group 16 for the N-Line and Ultimate trims, whereas the Toyota Yaris goes from insurance group 13 in Icon trim to group 14 for all other grades. Which has the best interior? 10 Despite being one of the older cars in its class, the Kia Rio still holds up relatively well in the interior stakes – no doubt helped by the light refresh as part of the car’s facelift in 2020. While there are some scratchy plastics in the cabin and not all of the more interesting tech is available across the range (entry-level cars do without the seven-inch touchscreen, for instance), the Kia Rio nevertheless feels solidly put together and comes with enough creature comforts to suit most buyers’ needs.

Being more recent arrivals on the new car scene, the Toyota Yaris and Hyundai i20 do feel that bit more contemporary inside, thanks to the more minimalist control layouts on the dashboard and touchscreen infotainment systems across the range with built-in smartphone integration. Overall fit-and-finish feels a bit better here than in the Kia, too – though, like the Rio, the Hyundai i20 and Toyota Yaris do have their fair share of cheaper-feeling plastics dotted throughout the cabin. Plus, none of the cars here are exactly the standard bearers for exciting dashboard design – you’ll need to look elsewhere for a supermini that brings to the table a stylish interior. Which is the most practical? Being small cars, none of the superminis here are the last word in roominess and practicality. That said, considering their size, neither the Toyota Yaris, Hyundai i20 or Kia Rio are especially cramped inside, though there are areas where particular cars here have a noticeable advantage over the others. This is perhaps most obvious with regards to boot space. Perhaps surprisingly, considering it’s the oldest car in this line-up, the Kia Rio has a handily large boot – at 325 litres, it’s one of the roomier superminis on sale right now, and isn’t too far off what bigger family hatchbacks, like the Kia Ceed or the Ford Focus, can muster. In contrast, the Toyota Yaris has a less impressive cargo capacity of 286 litres, though part of that is due to the way the battery pack for the hybrid powertrain is packaged in the car. 10 With regards to the Hyundai i20, the boot size can vary quite a bit depending on which version you go for. Opt for a car with a mild-hybrid engine option and, as a result of the way the battery is positioned underneath the boot floor, there’s just 262 litres of storage space on offer, which is on par with what many smaller city cars are capable of. In contrast, Hyundai i20 models that go without the mild-hybrid tech see their boot capacities grow to a more impressive 352 litres.

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